84000 Glossary of Terms

Our trilingual glossary combining entries from all of our publications into one useful resource, giving translations and definitions of thousands of terms, people, places, and texts from the Buddhist canon.

མ་ག་དྷཱ། | Glossary of Terms

  • མ་ག་ཏ།

  • མ་ག་དྷ།
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • མཉམ་དགའ།
  • ma ga d+hA
  • ma ga dhA
  • ma ga ta
  • mnyam dga’
  • magadha
  • magadhā
  • māgadha
  • Note: this data is still being sorted
  • Place
Publications: 40

An ancient Indian kingdom that lay to the south of the Ganges River in what today is the state of Bihar. Magadha was the largest of the sixteen “great states” (mahājanapada) that flourished between the sixth and third centuries ʙᴄᴇ in northern India. During the life of the Buddha Śākyamuni, it was ruled by King Bimbisāra and later by Bimbisāra's son, Ajātaśatru. Its capital was initially Rājagṛha (modern-day Rajgir) but was later moved to Pāṭaliputra (modern-day Patna). Over the centuries, with the expansion of the Magadha’s might, it became the capital of the vast Mauryan empire and seat of the great King Aśoka.

This region is home to many of the most important Buddhist sites, including Bodh Gayā, where the Buddha attained awakening; Vulture Peak (Gṛdhra­kūṭa), where the Buddha bestowed many well-known Mahāyāna sūtras; and the Buddhist university of Nālandā that flourished between the fifth and twelfth centuries ᴄᴇ, among many others.

  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷ།
  • ma ga d+ha
  • magadha
Definition in this text:

A kingdom on the banks of the Ganges (in the southern part of the modern day Indian state of Bihar), whose capital was at Pāṭaliputra (modern day Patna). During the life of Śākyamuni Buddha, it was the dominant kingdom in north central India and is home to many of the most important Buddhist sites, including Bodh Gayā, Nālandā, and its capital Rājagṛha.

  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga dhA
  • magadha
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga dhA
  • magadha AD
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • མ་ག་ཏ།
  • ma ga dhA
  • ma ga ta
  • magadha AD
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷ།
  • ma ga dha
  • magadha
Definition in this text:

The ancient kingdom in what is now southern Bihar, within which the Buddha attained enlightenment. During most of the life of the Buddha it was ruled by King Bimbisāra. During the Buddha’s later years it began to expand greatly under the reign of King Ajātaśatru, and in the third century, during the reign of Aśoka, it become an empire that controlled most of India.

  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷ།
  • ma ga dha
  • magadha AS
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷ།
  • ma ga dha
  • magadha
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷ།
  • ma ga dha
  • magadha
  • 摩竭
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷ།
  • ma ga d+ha
  • magadha AD
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷ།
  • ma ga dha
  • magadha
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga dhA
  • magadha
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷ།
  • ma ga dha
  • magadha
Definition in this text:

The largest kingdom of northern India during the time of the Buddha.

  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷ།
  • ma ga dha
  • magadha
  • Magadha
  • མཉམ་དགའ།
  • mnyam dga’
  • magadha
Definition in this text:

An ancient Indian kingdom that lay to the south of the Ganges River in what today is the state of Bihar. Magadha was the largest of the sixteen “great states” (mahājanapada) that flourished between the sixth and third centuries ʙᴄᴇ in northern India. During the life of the Buddha Śākyamuni, it was ruled by King Bimbisāra and was home to many of the most important Buddhist sites, including Bodh Gayā, Nālandā, and Rājagṛha. Its capital was initially Rājagṛha but was later moved to Pāṭaliputra (modern-day Patna) sometime after the reign of Bimbisāra’s usurper son, Ajātaśatru.

  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷ།
  • ma ga dha
  • magadha
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷ།
  • ma ga dha
  • magadha
Definition in this text:

This ancient kingdom is in what is now southern Bihar, within which the Buddha attained enlightenment. During most of the life of the Buddha it was ruled by King Bimbisara. During the Buddha’s later years it began to expand greatly under the reign of King Ajataśatru. In the third century ᴄᴇ, during the reign of Aśoka, it become an empire that controlled most of India.

  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷ།
  • ma ga dha
  • magadha
Definition in this text:

The ancient kingdom in what is now south Bihar. Its king, Bimbisāra, became a patron of Śakyāmuni.

  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷ།
  • ma ga dha
  • magadha
Definition in this text:

The largest kingdom of northern India during the time of the Buddha.

  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga dhA
  • magadha
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga d+hA
  • magadha AO
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga d+hA
  • māgadha
  • magadha
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga d+hA
  • magadha
Definition in this text:

An ancient Indian kingdom located in what is today southern Bihar.

  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷ།
  • ma ga dha
  • magadha
Definition in this text:

An ancient Indian kingdom that lay to the south of the Ganges river in what is today the state of Bihar. Magadha was the largest of the sixteen “great states” (Mahājanapada) that flourished between the sixth and third centuries ʙᴄᴇ in northern India. During the life of the Buddha Śākyamuni, it was ruled by King Bimbisāra and was home to many of the most important Buddhist sites, including Bodh Gayā, Nālandā, and Rājagṛha. Its capital was initially Rājagṛha but was later moved to Pāṭaliputra (modern day Patna) sometime after the reign of Bimbisāra's usurper son, Ajātaśatru.

  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷ།
  • ma ga d+ha
  • magadha
Definition in this text:

A kingdom on the banks of the Ganges (in the southern part of the modern day Indian state of Bihar), whose capital was at Pāṭaliputra (modern day Patna). During the life of Śākyamuni Buddha, it was the dominant kingdom in north central India and is home to many of the most important Buddhist sites, including Bodh Gayā, Nālandā, and its capital Rājagṛha.

  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga d+hA
  • magadha
Definition in this text:

A kingdom on the banks of the Ganges (in the southern part of the modern-day Indian state of Bihar), whose capital was at Pāṭaliputra (modern-day Patna). During the life of the Buddha Śākyamuni, it was the dominant kingdom in north-central India and is home to many of the most important Buddhist sites, including Bodh Gayā, Nālandā, and its capital Rājagṛha.

  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga dhA
  • magadha
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga d+hA
  • magadha
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga d+hA
  • magadha
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga d+hA
  • magadha
Definition in this text:

An ancient Indian kingdom that lay to the south of the Ganges River in what today is the state of Bihar. Magadha was the largest of the sixteen “great states” (mahājanapada) that flourished between the sixth and third centuries ʙᴄᴇ in northern India. During the life of the Buddha Śākyamuni, it was ruled by King Bimbisāra and was home to many of the most important Buddhist sites, including Bodh Gayā, Nālandā, and Rājagṛha. Its capital was initially Rājagṛha but was later moved to Pāṭaliputra (modern-day Patna) sometime after the reign of Bimbisāra's usurper son, Ajātaśatru.

  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga dhA
  • magadha
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga dhA
  • magadha
Definition in this text:

One of the most important regions during the time of Buddha Śākyamuni, ruled by Bimbisāra and later his son Ajātaśatru from the capital Rājagṛha.

  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga d+hA
  • magadha
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga dhA
  • magadha
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga dhA
  • magadha
  • magadhā
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga d+hA
  • magadha
Definition in this text:

A kingdom on the banks of the Ganges (in the southern part of the modern day Indian state of Bihar), whose capital was at Pāṭaliputra (modern day Patna). During the life of the Buddha Śākyamuni, it was the dominant kingdom in north central India and is home to many of the most important Buddhist sites, including Bodh Gayā, Nālandā, and its capital Rājagṛha.

  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga d+hA
  • magadha
Definition in this text:

A large and important kingdom during the time of the Buddha Śākyamuni, ruled by Bimbisāra and later his son Ajātaśatru from the capital Rājagṛha.

  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga dhA
  • magadha
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷ།
  • ma ga dha
  • magadha
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga d+hA
  • magadha
  • Magadha
  • མ་ག་དྷཱ།
  • ma ga d+hA
  • magadha